wtfbadromancecovers:

And now for something a little different!

Okay, I am a bit of a nail polish fiend, so when a local friend who makes her own amazing polish (which I wear all the time) said she was going to open an Etsy shop, I proposed she make me an official WTFBadRomanceCovers set. These are the results, based on lots of our recurring themes here and of course the most popular WTFBRC post of all time.

You can pick them up here, and Nail Tisane was nice enough to even gave me a promo code, WTFRC, so you can save 5% on them if you decide to pick them up! She’s selling them individually, as well as in sets that get you a little bit of a discount. (There may even be a secret bonus polish if you order the whole set.)

If you’re a boy writer, it’s a simple rule: you’ve gotta get used to the fact that you suck at writing women and that the worst women writer can write a better man than the best male writer can write a good woman. And it’s just the minimum. Because the thing about the sort of heteronormative masculine privilege, whether it’s in Santo Domingo, or the United States, is you grow up your entire life being told that women aren’t human beings, and that women have no independent subjectivity. And because you grow up with this, it’s this huge surprise when you go to college and realize that, “Oh, women aren’t people who does my shit and fucks me.”

And I think that this a huge challenge for boys, because they want to pretend they can write girls. Every time I’m teaching boys to write, I read their women to them, and I’m like, “Yo, you think this is good writing?” These motherfuckers attack each other over cliche lines but they won’t attack each other over these toxic representations of women that they have inherited… their sexist shorthand, they think that is observation. They think that their sexist distortions are insight. And if you’re in a writing program and you say to a guy that their characters are sexist, this guy, it’s like you said they fucking love Hitler. They will fight tooth and nail because they want to preserve this really vicious sexism in the art because that is what they have been taught.

And I think the first step is to admit that you, because of your privilege, have a very distorted sense of women’s subjectivity. And without an enormous amount of assistance, you’re not even going to get a D. I think with male writers the most that you can hope for is a D with an occasional C thrown in. Where the average women writer, when she writes men, she gets a B right off the bat, because they spent their whole life being taught that men have a subjectivity. In fact, part of the whole feminism revolution was saying, “Me too, motherfuckers.” So women come with it built in because of the society.

It’s the same way when people write about race. If you didn’t grow up being a subaltern person in the United States, you might need help writing about race. Motherfuckers are like ‘I got a black boy friend,’ and their shit sounds like Klan Fiction 101.

The most toxic formulas in our cultures are not pass down in political practice, they’re pass down in mundane narratives. It’s our fiction where the toxic virus of sexism, racism, homophobia, where it passes from one generation to the next, and the average artist will kill you before they remove those poisons. And if you want to be a good artist, it means writing, really, about the world. And when you write cliches, whether they are sexist, racist, homophobic, classist, that is a fucking cliche. And motherfuckers will kill you for their cliches about x, but they want their cliches about their race, class, queerness. They want it in there because they feel lost without it. So for me, this has always been the great challenge.

As a writer, if you’re really trying to write something new, you must figure out, with the help of a community, how can you shed these fucking received formulas. They are received. You didn’t come up with them. And why we need fellow artists is because they help us stay on track. They tell you, “You know what? You’re a bit of a fucking homophobe.” You can’t write about the world with these simplistic distortions. They are cliches. People know art, always, because they are uncomfortable. Art discomforts. The trangressiveness of art has to deal with confronting people with the real. And sexism is a way to avoid the real, avoiding the reality of women. Homophobia is to avoid the real, the reality of queerness. All these things are the way we hide from encountering the real. But art, art is just about that.

chefthisup:

Cucumber Dill Greek Yogurt Salad.
Get the recipe here » http://bit.ly/16xJG9E

chefthisup:

Cucumber Dill Greek Yogurt Salad.

Get the recipe here » http://bit.ly/16xJG9E

(Source: brutalgeneration)

marrymetomhardy:

happicuppa:

kpop-porn:

Godfrey Gao for Earl Jeans - Part 1 | 2

THIS IS AN AD FOR JEANS?!

HE IS TRYING TO RUIN MY GOD DAMN LIFE I SWEAR TO GOD

Merf. Thinking is Hard.: soyonscruels: i am not your nice girl You know what one of my biggest...

soyonscruels:

i am not your nice girl

You know what one of my biggest — but not the biggest, not at all, but, nevertheless, big — problems with the Nice Guy phenomenon is? One I have never seen discussed, which is why I am doing it now— it’s this: that I don’t want to date a nice…

alantyson:

pantsareforassholes:

digg:

Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart are best friends and it’s perfect.

These two are so cool.

Ambition: when I get old, I want at least one cool old friend that I go do shit with.

watermystic277:

X

That is a disney-ass owl.

(Source: animal-diversity)

rottenwits:

TIMELESS. The Final and Approved Picture: APSARA in NEW YORK Time Square!One moment recreated across generations: the traditions of Cambodian dance have survived centuries of changing landscapes, as demonstrated in these magnificent photos of the Royal Ballet in 1971 and 2013 in the ever-changing Times Square NYC. The Royal Ballet of Cambodia is finally in NYC again. In honor of their return, we would like to share these captivating photos with you!PHOTO CREDIT: Pete Pin / Season of Cambodia

rottenwits:

TIMELESS. The Final and Approved Picture: APSARA in NEW YORK Time Square!

One moment recreated across generations: the traditions of Cambodian dance have survived centuries of changing landscapes, as demonstrated in these magnificent photos of the Royal Ballet in 1971 and 2013 in the ever-changing Times Square NYC. The Royal Ballet of Cambodia is finally in NYC again. In honor of their return, we would like to share these captivating photos with you!


PHOTO CREDIT: Pete Pin / Season of Cambodia

(Source: poetri-cal)